Replies

  • Are you saying I can go to a weight store and those weights will work- that seems more feasible. The sand thing seems burdensome in that you have to fill them up and empty them if you cant lift when done- also shipping anything tht heavy seems to quite expensive.

    thanks for the help-

    Connie Mettler said:
    Excellent article, Don. Thanks for that and continuing to be a great source for lots of us.

    Additionally, there is an ad on this site for weights. I have posted this ad free of charge because the people who make these weights are friends of mine and I think these weights meet many requirements for artist.

    1. They are designed and manufactured by artists who really know this business, James Eaton and Kathleen Eaton.
    2. They are small enough to fit into tight spaces in a crowded van.
    3. They are stackable - you use as many as you think the weather requires.
    4. They are individually light enough for anyone to handle them.
  • I have seen some people with 1-gallon jugs of water on each corner; these weigh under 10 pounds each which is not enough weight to hold up under much wind. I have been using weight bags (filled with pea gravel = 30 lbs. each) that I bought from EZ-Up years ago and they work okay, but I'd like more weight. I also use the dog stake things that you twist into the ground (the ones for very large dogs) and those are great. Well, they're great as long as you have ground that you can grind them into....

    Good luck with your shows!
  • I want to add my stamp of approval for the Stack On Weights. I've had them for about eight years now and they have saved my booth several times. Maintenance is sanding them with steel wool about once a year and giving them a new coat of Rustoleum paint. In addition to the advantages that Connie mentioned, I'd like to add a few more:

    1. In case of a sudden storm or gust of wind, you can move weights from one leg to another in seconds. No untying or unstrapping needed. At Artisphere about five years ago, a storm developed with very high straight line winds and I was quickly able to shift my weights to the corner needed. I was one of the closest booths to the river, where the wind was coming from. It saved my booth. The performance stage didn't fare as well - it went into the river.

    2. These weights will not roll in the van, unlike the PVC's, causing a shift in weight when swerving.

    3. The weights stack around the legs of the canopy. Nothing to swing from the canopy structure.

    They hold the booth much better than drilling into the concrete or asphalt. I have introduced many of my artist friends to the product and they all swear by them. Jim Eaton did an outstanding job of designing them.

    I'd like to add one more thing. I used the PVC/concrete weights about 25 years ago with my KD. When I was at Milw. Lakefront, a dust-devil hit my booth and flipped my canopy, with weights attached, upside down over the glass blower's booth behind me. One weight dropped into his booth, shearing off his formica counter display and the other flew over the heads of the pedestrians in the pathway and landed next to the glassblower sitting in his chair. Both weights were deadly, flying missiles. That was the last time I used them and cringe every time I see them at shows. I think they should be banned, IMHO.

    Connie Mettler said:
    Excellent article, Don. Thanks for that and continuing to be a great source for lots of us.

    Additionally, there is an ad on this site for weights. I have posted this ad free of charge because the people who make these weights are friends of mine and I think these weights meet many requirements for artist.

    1. They are designed and manufactured by artists who really know this business, James Eaton and Kathleen Eaton.
    2. They are small enough to fit into tight spaces in a crowded van.
    3. They are stackable - you use as many as you think the weather requires.
    4. They are individually light enough for anyone to handle them.
  • Excellent article, Don. Thanks for that and continuing to be a great source for lots of us.

    Additionally, there is an ad on this site for weights. I have posted this ad free of charge because the people who make these weights are friends of mine and I think these weights meet many requirements for artist.

    1. They are designed and manufactured by artists who really know this business, James Eaton and Kathleen Eaton.
    2. They are small enough to fit into tight spaces in a crowded van.
    3. They are stackable - you use as many as you think the weather requires.
    4. They are individually light enough for anyone to handle them.
  • I use sand bags that I ordered from easy up canopies on line. They work really well and if I fill them completely, they weigh 40 lbs each. I aslo use tractor weights that are 40lbs each and water if there is any at the show. The sand bags are a little hard to pack..........The best is probably what Bonnie Blandford used which is pcp pipe filled with lead shot. She used to tell how to make them on her website. Michele
  • Thanks this has been very helpful- a picture is worth a thousand thanks- I am in Boston and have heard about the wind where that fair is.
  • don crozier said:
    Hi,

    Jef Walker posted this on another list....

    Canopy Weight Guidelines
    http://www.southendopenmarket.com/tips1.htm

    Good tips!

    Don
  • Hi,

    Jef Walker posted this on another list....

    Canopy Weight Guidelines
    http://www.southendopenmarket.com/tips1.htm

    Good tips!

    Don
  • All good suggestions, Bill. Whatever you do Nancy, do not neglect to have weights. Wind is the biggest hazard at art fairs. We not only carried 40 lbs of weights for each leg of the tent we also had dog stakes for when we were on grass...took a long rope from the top corner of the tent and tied it down.

    In the worst winds twice our van was near and we parked the van in front of the booth! Another time despite the stakes and the weight bags we tied the tent to a nearby dumpster.
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