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A few weeks ago someone commented in this forum about a new product called "art bags" or "art pacs". They were designed to protect artwork during transport. It was NOT gallery pouch. I can't find it anywhere. Does anyone else remember, or know of this product?


Lisa Crisman
www.LeftEarArt.com

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I put random heavy objects on top of the sides, if that's what you mean by clamps XD I really should have put bull clips, come to think of it. I'll definitely have to check out that website and see if the shipping fees would make it worthwhile to buy online from them. I figured for experimenting I'd just buy the roll at the store and bother with cheaper means once I learned this stuff would be adequate.

My $15 roll was 16" x 25' so that website sounds like a good deal if shipping isn't murder. I also had to join a couple of sheets together at the seams to make it big enough for a larger envelope.

The bags are roasting outside in my car right now so I'll come back this evening with results!

Lisa Marie Crisman said:
Angela, Insulation 4 Less.com appears to have a product similar to Reflectix (foil,bubble wrap, foil) but it's only $99 for 48 inches by 125 feet.
Did you clamp the 2 sides together after glueing? Please let us know how your experiment turns out, as I'm also interested in doing it myself to try & save some $.



Angela R. Sasser said:
An earlier commenter on this thread described sheets of heat insulation that are basically polyethylene bubbles coated on each side by thin foil. Well I did a little research and found a roll of the stuff at Lowes for $15 (cheaper than I've found bubble wrap in large rolls, surprisingly!). It's by a company called Reflextic, who has dubbed it 'reflective insulation).

Well I got a wild hair and tried making pouches out of this stuff using hot glue on one and Goop on another. I'm going to toss them in the car and leave them all day tomorrow and pull them out to see if the glue keeps its bond. Thus far, they were incredibly easy to make with the insulation sheets being super easy to cut with normal scissors.

I also see that Reflectix sells a bonding tape for the sheets, which might be better to use than glue. Going to see if I can't find that at Lowe's too. I suspect as it's used for heat insulation that the tape won't get gummy at all (which we don't want happening on our art!)

I also really liked Mark's sample of the Gallery Pouch product. It was much as described. Cozy for your art with handy velcro, but I think I'm going to DIY and save a little money till I can afford to spend more on professionally produced pouches. Insulation sheets also provide a little more heat protection, if art is left in a trailer for long amounts of time, I imagine!

Will come and post here when I have tested my ghetto art pouches out more thoroughly!
We also sell them without velcro, and have volume discounts and sales which can help....but you can make a less durable version with a bubble roll from uline, duct tape and roll of velcro. We put velcro along the entire seem but you can just cut a few 1 inch pieces and put just enough to hold the flap down. I say less durable only because Uline does not sell the heavy duty 3rd web bubble.

Cheers,
Mark
Frame Destination, Inc.

Sara Youngman said:
The sample of the bubble pack with velcro is lovely, but at $19/per I can't afford them for the 30+ framed pieces
Okay guys! Here's the report on the ghetto DIY reflective insulation pouches and how they survived being left in a car from 6am to 6pm in sunny 75 degree Georgia weather.

The Goop and all purpose hot glue stood up well, though the Goop stunk up my whole car with glue fumes so I'm probably going to axe it off the list. The hot glue was warm, but not tacky enough to rub off on anything. The Goop seems to have formed a stronger bond, but it's not like envelopes need to be super strong since they're basically wrapping around the piece (unless you build in a handle, which would put more stress on the corners).

I'm investigating a 3rd option, which is aluminum foil tape that I purchased at Lowes for about $7.50 for 50 yds. I've made a 3rd envelope using the foil tape and it seems just as sturdy as the ones made with glue. I'm going to leave the taped envelope in the car tomorrow in direct sunlight from 6am to 6pm like I did with the previous ones and see how it fairs. Considering this tape is made to insulate sensitive materials from chemicals and heat, I have a feeling it's going to hold up just fine.

Velcro snaps to keep the flaps closed should be the finishing touch!

So far, it hasn't taken me long at all to make a single envelope and it doesn't seem terribly expensive, especially if you can order things cheaper online. I'm declaring this experiment a success!
For my 16x20 and 11x14 frames, I use plastic bins. They're sturdy and I can get everything I need into 2 bins.

Sara Youngman said:
Bought the 15" x 25' roll of insulation at Lowe's and the $9 roll of aluminum tape. Spent an hour plus making 11 pouches out of the roll. They seem fine. Left a flap so I can put velcro, or put in a smaller frame. Need a couple more rolls of the stuff. Still haven't figured out though how I'm going to pack and carry them. Is there some sort of cinch belt with a handle (kind of like in the old movies when the kids carried their school books tied in an old belt) so I could carry a bundle in each hand? Logistics aren't obvious.
Sara, I'm planning to do what Lisa does, except that I use reused lamp boxes that fit my frames so they stand upright instead of stacking one atop the other. I've massively taped the bottoms of these cardboard boxes so they won't break open. The envelopes for me are just a covering much like using bubble wrap, except that the wrapping will last longer and not degrade like bubble wrap tends to.

Also, the envelope with the foil tape survived the 6am - 6pm far better than the glue ones as far as withstanding heat without getting tacky, though the tape doesn't seem to bond as strongly because it's somewhat thin and I can see it tearing if something gets a good angle on it. I'm going to double reinforce the corners just to be safe nothing pokes out and get heavier foil tape next time I'm at the shop.

I'm wondering about the addition of a handle myself! It might be handy if you have to lug any picture by itself somewhere for some reason, but that does create more areas of heavy tension on the bottom corners unless you do something that wraps all the way around and relieves tension, like Sara was talking about. Open to suggestions on this one!

Handles might be creating more work than is necessary, but it might be useful for lugging single heavy pieces. I'd be curious to see what any of you do with that idea.

Glad this experiment has been useful to others! :)
I've always used 32 sheet mat board boxes cut down to the height of my photographs. For handles, I cut a 2x4 inch horizontal opening half way up the side of the box after it's been cut down. That made it easy to carry a box under each arm with no chance of dropping it.

Larry Berman
Digital Jury Services
http://BermanGraphics.com
412-401-8100
Angela, yes, thank you so much! This has actually been on my to do list, and you've done the experimenting for us.
As for carrying single pieces, I have a 24"x28" waterproof nylon portfolio. It zippers all the way around 3 sides, has a long shoulder strap, and 2 smaller handles. It's functional and looks chic and professional for delivering paintings to customers. I've used it many, many times and is well worth the cost, which isn't that much (20-30$). Dick Blick carries similar inexpensive portfolios.
When I use my bins, I actually do stand my paintings upright. The bins do get heavy, but, they have sturdy handles, and I usually only have to lug them as far as my rock'n'roller cart.
Back to the bag experiment, do you think the tape will hold it, or will you use hot glue as well?
ah! The plastic bins I have are slanted on the sides so I can't stand them up without teetering. Must invest in something stable because my cardboard boxes are bound to degrade at some point. Where'd you get those bins at? <_br />
The nylon portfolios are a good idea! I have a couple saved from college classes that'd be good for simple lugging around (and a left over 'bag lady cart' I used to use for lugging dorm stuff).

I honestly think the thinner foil tape can hold up by itself without glue, but I'm double wrapping the corners just to be safe! If I can manage it this weekend, I'll take some photos or video of what I've been doing for folks to see. Will post here with results!

Now comes the only part of this that might not be so money saving, making envelopes for 20+ pieces!

Lisa Marie Crisman said:
Angela, yes, thank you so much! This has actually been on my to do list, and you've done the experimenting for us.
As for carrying single pieces, I have a 24"x28" waterproof nylon portfolio. It zippers all the way around 3 sides, has a long shoulder strap, and 2 smaller handles. It's functional and looks chic and professional for delivering paintings to customers. I've used it many, many times and is well worth the cost, which isn't that much (20-30$). Dick Blick carries similar inexpensive portfolios.
When I use my bins, I actually do stand my paintings upright. The bins do get heavy, but, they have sturdy handles, and I usually only have to lug them as far as my rock'n'roller cart.
Back to the bag experiment, do you think the tape will hold it, or will you use hot glue as well?
Hey all! I did a quick video on how I went about making my own envelopes. You can watch it at my blog. I also made a shout out to this site because it's been so helpful!:
http://angelicshades.blogspot.com/2010/04/tutorial-how-to-make-stor...

Sara, lucky! I cannot find the deluxe roll at my Lowe's. I'm going to check out Home Depot and see what they have. I also found the foil tape for a few bucks cheaper at Walmart in the Do It Yourself section.

Angela-Thank you for posting the video and info.  I am making these this morning, and just so thankful how easy it is!  Lisa

I made my "Reflectix" envelopes for my 16x20 frames, and I love them! They look very professional, and will do a much better job protecting my frames than my old method. I'm also hoping they'll be somewhat waterproof! From a 25 foot roll, I got 11 envelopes, I may be able to squeeze out 12 on the next roll. I put my frames back to back, so I get 2 in per envelope. With the foil tape figured in, my cost per envelope is just over $5.
Thanks Angela for doing the initial experiment and sharing!
Lisa Crisman
www.LeftEarArt.com
Oh my! What a collection of envelopes you've done! So happy this idea has helped you out. I don't even think I have that many yet! I need to get cracking this as I have quite a lot of art to transport to DragonCon.

Best of luck to you and hope the envelopes serve you well!:)

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